License & F.A.Q.

License Information

Please do not hesitate to contact us regarding Licensing Issues. We are here to help you.

Can I make a photocopy of this music?
There’s a 99.9% chance that you cannot make a photocopy of your music without getting a Print License from the publisher.

 

What exactly is a Print License?
If you are making a photocopy of a piece of music or the lyrics to a song, you will need a Print License.  This is typically done for choral anthems that are no longer in print but additional copies are needed.  If this is you, we can help.  Click here and you’ll be taken to the License Request page.  There’s a short form that you’ll need to fill out.  Someone in our Licensing Department will get back to you within 24 hours.
If you are wanting to reproduce lyrics for congregational worship, you may or may not need a Print License.  Does your church have a CCLI and/or a OneLicense.net license?  If so, you are most likely covered for what you want to do.  If your church doesn’t have one of these licenses, you’ll need to get permission to make those copies.  Again, click here to fill out the form and request the license that you need.  If you’re not sure and want to talk to someone about whether you need a Print License or not, you can email us.
Do I Need a Synchronization License?
Synchronization Licenses are required whenever a song is married – or, synchronized – to a visual image.  This includes videos, films, slideshows, art displays, etc…  If there’s a song and if there’s also any kind of visual component to the end result, then a Synchronization License is a must.  This requirement is true for any videos being posted to websites – including YouTube.   If you need a Synchronization License of one of our songs, then click here and you’ll be taken to the License Request page.  There’s a short form that you’ll need to fill out.  Someone in our Licensing Department will get back to you within 24 hours.
Do I Need a Performance License?
If music is being performed (or broadcast) to an audience, then a Performance License is required.  However, there is a significant carve-out in the Copyright Law on this right:  churches are considered “exempt” from needing a Performance License if the music is being performed in the context of a regularly scheduled worship service AND there are no hired musicians (other than regular paid staff members) participating in those performances.  The first part seems pretty straightforward – if your church meets at 10:00 on Sunday mornings, then anything you do during that service is likely exempt from needing a Performance License.  Same is true if your church services are at 9:00 and 11:00 on Sunday.  Or at 7:00 on Saturday night.  The key is not the day or the time.  What matters is that the service is a regularly scheduled event.  That would mean that any concerts or special musical presentations are not eligible under the exemption allowance.  For those events, you will need to obtain a Performance License, which you can do by clicking here and filling out the form.
The second part of the exemption allowance is where things get tricky for churches.  If your church hires outside musicians (either instrumentalists or vocalists), then the church’s exemption for the songs on which those players were employed is lost.  This only applies to outside performers who are hired irregularly.  It does not apply to any regular employees of the church.   Most churches (and many publishers) don’t understand this wrinkle in the US Copyright Law.  If you feel that you may be in violation of this provision, please contact us with any questions or concerns.  Our efforts are always to work with churches on matters like this.  You can email us here with any questions or concerns.  Someone will get back to you with answers.
My pastor wants to post a video of our choir concert on the church’s website. Do we need a license to do that?

Synchronization Licenses are required whenever a song is married – or, synchronized – to a visual image.  This includes videos, films, slideshows, art displays, etc…  If there’s a song and if there’s also any kind of visual component to the end result, then a Synchronization License is a must.  This requirement is true for any videos being posted to websites – including YouTube.   If you need a Synchronization License of one of our songs, then click here and you’ll be taken to the License Request page.  There’s a short form that you’ll need to fill out.  Someone in our Licensing Department will get back to you within 24 hours.

My friend owns a restaurant, and he told me that he has to get a Performance License to legally have music played in his establishment. I know that our church plays music all the time. Do we need to have a Performance License, too?
If music is being performed (or broadcast) to an audience, then a Performance License is required.  However, there is a significant carve-out in the Copyright Law on this right:  churches are considered “exempt” from needing a Performance License if the music is being performed in the context of a regularly scheduled worship service AND there are no hired musicians (other than regular paid staff members) participating in those performances.  The first part seems pretty straightforward – if your church meets at 10:00 on Sunday mornings, then anything you do during that service is likely exempt from needing a Performance License.  Same is true if your church services are at 9:00 and 11:00 on Sunday.  Or at 7:00 on Saturday night.  The key is not the day or the time.  What matters is that the service is a regularly scheduled event.  That would mean that any concerts or special musical presentations are not eligible under the exemption allowance.  For those events, you will need to obtain a Performance License, which you can do by clicking here and filling out the form.
Can I scan this music and send it to my choir members for rehearsal?
No, you can’t do this.  Without express permission from the publisher who owns the song, a scan would be considered an unauthorized duplication, just as if you had made a photocopy.
But I purchased a copy of the music for each singer, why can’t I do this? It’s so much easier?
Yes, we know it’s easier.  And we appreciate you purchasing the music.  However, having the copies in your library does not give you the right to make any duplications – either physical or digital – of that music and distribute it to your choir.  If you wish to make those copies, you’ll need to obtain a Print License from the publisher.
I recorded a bunch of my favorite songs and I want to make CDs. The duplication house is making me get a mechanical licenses for all of the songs. What is that?
Mechanical Licenses cover the reproduction of a song through recorded means.  (For those who are interested, the term “mechanical” dates back to the era of player pianos that required rolls which were mechanically reproduced – hence the name.  The player piano business ended many moons ago, but the term coined to cover the use of songs in that medium stuck around a lot longer.)  The Mechanical Licenses covers both physical recordings (CDs) and digital recordings (downloads).  The rate is statutory, meaning that it is set by Congressional legislation through the Library of Congress.  The current rate is $.091 per song (per CD, if applicable).  This is for the first five minutes.  If the song exceeds five minutes, then the rate changes to $.0175 per minute (or fraction thereof).  If you need a Mechanical License of one of our songs, then click here and you’ll be taken to the License Request page.  There’s a short form that you’ll need to fill out.  Someone in our Licensing Department will get back to you within 24 hours.
How Do I Submit My Work?

THE BASICS

We prefer submissions by email to info@fredbock.com. Sibelius or Finale files are accepted. You may “snail mail” your composition, but it will be returned ONLY if you enclose a SASE.

Submit no more than three pieces at a time.

Include a recording of a performance of the piece if you have one. Or, make a midi from your Finale or Sibelius file.
Pieces longer than 6 minutes in duration submitted from composers not already in our catalog will not be accepted for review.
A short introduction of yourself and your musical experience is encouraged.
Do not submit any pieces to more than one publisher at a time – no simultaneous submissions accepted.

DETAILS

Sacred Music: Our catalog primarily reaches the more traditional and liturgical houses of worship, though we are open to submissions of a more contemporary nature

Secular (Original or Arrangements): We are more likely to be interested if the arrangement is distinctive, new, creative, and the original song does not already appear in our catalog. If using a published (copyrighted) poem, include a copy of the original poem, data about the poet, and any royalty agreements you may have reached prior to submission.

Foreign language texts (including Latin) must have a pronunciation guide and translation attached.

Traditionally all new manuscripts are reviewed by our Editorial Board twice a year – in June and in November.

WHERE TO SEND YOUR MUSIC

SUBMISSIONS
FRED BOCK MUSIC
PO Box 10069
Glendale, CA 91209

info@fredbock.com

Choral Director Approved

We are choir directors, we get choir directors. 

Church Choir Friendly

Your choir will love our music!

Updated Catalog

We update our catalog twice a year!

agsdix-smt1-access-time

Always Available

Our website is mobile friendly and always on!

Looking for more information?

Not finding what you are looking for? Are you still looking for answers? We have even more answers! Just ask!